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  1. Recently I stayed in a budget hotel as I delivered 2 days training. I’m used to budget hotels. I don’t need a lot so the Premier Inn (aka Purple Palace) meets all of my needs.

    It provides:

    • A comfy bed
    • A quiet room
    • A good breakfast
    • Option to purchase an evening meal (so the lone traveller doesn’t have to venture into the unknown to get fed)
    • A hairdryer (important for the female traveller)
    • Free wi-fi (important for the business traveller)
    • Enough towels

    There’s no gym, or catering for specialist diets, or room upgrades, or room service, but that’s OK – it’s a budget hotel.

    However, on this occasion I was booked into a different chain. The bed was OK and for the most part it was comfortable and quiet (I got around 5 hours sleep), but there NO food available at all, only 30 minutes wifi, no hairdryer, no extractor fan in the bathroom and only 2 towels so the smaller towel has be used for hand washing, teeth-brushing, standing on when you get out of the shower AND wrapping your hair.

    How they are in business when the Premier Inn exists I have no idea.

    Budget should mean you have all the basics, and the basics are good. The opportunities for personalisation are minimal. This is what keeps the price down. A standard service, not a limited (or dare I say it) inadequate service. A service that’s predictable, reliable and provides everything you need, if not everything you would want.

    I modelled my Power Hour training materials on the Premier Inn – standard, not fancy (I’ve done all the typesetting myself, and you print them out) but providing all the content and guidance you need to run as great training session. Good value. A bargain. Because there’s a difference between budget and cheap.

    fivers

  2. At the outset, I would like to frame this piece by stressing that I DON'T advertise myself as a coach. I have a basic qualification in coaching and don't offer coaching as a stand-alone service. However, I do help managers to develop basic coaching skills so that they can have constructive and developmental conversations with their teams. So... here's goes.

    I ran a half-day session on coaching skills for managers recently. There was a confusion over what coaching actually is. As I see it, it means different things to different people. The construction manager will tell you that he's coaching people when he shows them how to build a wall; the engineering team leader may tell you she's coaching people when they solve a problem together; the professional coach may tell you that it's about unlocking personal obstacles.

    Some people are scared to offer 'coaching' at work because they associate it with counselling. Some people feel that it can only take place in a long, formal session and therefore isn't compatible with the modern business needs of agility and pace. Others think that they can only coach someone if they are an expert themselves.

    This is why I wanted to state my position at the start: I'm not precious about the definition people use. To me, 'coaching' can fall anywhere on the continuum below, and the format of coaching will vary depending on the nature of the issue, the urgency of finding a solution, the relationship between the individuals, whether there is a single 'right' way or many, and the risk associated with choosing an untested path. What matters is that people work together to find the best way forward for them.

    coaching continuum

     

     

    I cover this in my bite-size module 'Coach People', as well as the core skills. It's not designed to provide the skills needed to be a professioanl coach. It's designed to help line managers have supportive yet challenging developmental conversations with their people to create learning from real-work situations.

  3. You can download a guide to using picture cards in training from our FREE STUFF page!